A Visit To the Bruce Museum

Hello everyone! This is just a quick post! I hope you enjoy!

Today I took a slight detour from my usual routine and drove to the Bruce Museum. The Bruce Museum is a medium0sized establishment in Greenwich Connecticut. It is a very beautiful museum and makes the most of its space. I was especially excited to go due to the fact that their new exhibition: Madagascar: ghosts of the past has just opened, and it features casts of some amazing fossil specimens.

The museum lobby is a gorgeous space with a very modern essence to it. A gannet in a diving position is centered in the middle of the dome ceiling. It’s almost poetic, really. The seabird is diving towards the museum to ‘immerse’ itself in knowledge.

The Gannet in the main Lobby. Photo by the author, 2015.

The Gannet in the main Lobby. Photo by the author, 2015.

My first stop was their signature exhibit Changes in Our Land. The exhibit displays a wide variety of taxidermy animals native to the Northeast US as well as a variety of local and non-local specimens. The entrance to the exhibit sets the tone perfectly with a generalized display of things you’ll find in the exhibit.

The opening display of Changes in Our Land. Photo by the author, 2015.

The opening display of Changes in Our Land. Photo by the author, 2015.

The next room is the Geology hall, which features a menagerie of Geological specimens, most of which are from the Northeast. Tucked away in one of the corners of the exhibit is the Florescent mineral room, which has some interactive features. Just as I left, a group of kids were having a lesson in the hall, and I had to hastily squeeze my way through the little ones. The rocky wall surface is a great touch and really makes the exhibit more immersive.

The first corridor of the Geology hall, with the Florescent mineral room in the back. Photo by the author, 2015.

The first corridor of the Geology hall, with the Florescent mineral room in the back. Photo by the author, 2015.

Finally it was time for the Fossil room! The permanent fossil exhibit is small, but it does a good job of conveying information in small, bite-sized chunks. Many of the fossils are accompanied by a beautiful (and in some cases outdated) illustration of the animal in life. One of the more interesting fossils is a plate which features some Eubrontes tracks from the Connecticut valley. A rather small label reads “Please do not stand on Dinosaur Footprints”. Oh, you have NO idea.

The Giant Beaver skull in the fossil exhibit. Photo by the author, 2015.

The Giant Beaver skull in the fossil exhibit. Photo by the author, 2015.

A trilobite also makes an appearance. Photo by the author, 2015.

A trilobite also makes an appearance. Photo by the author, 2015.

And so does a Mesosaurus. Photo by the author, 2015.

And so does a Mesosaurus. Photo by the author, 2015.

And a Brontothere. Brontotheres are FUN! Photo by the author, 2015.

And a Brontothere. Brontotheres are FUN! Photo by the author, 2015.

And a Mammoth... tooth. Still cool though. Photo by the author, 2015.

And a Mammoth… tooth. Still cool though. Photo by the author, 2015.

An Allosaurus skull also hangs from the ceiling. It’s a nice touch to what otherwise would be an exhibit full of only small fossils. It also brings the essence of a ‘Dinosaur Museum’, which always makes the visit more fun for many kids.

The Flying Allosaurus fragilis head. Photo by the author, 2015.

The Flying Allosaurus fragilis head. Photo by the author, 2015.

After that, a hallway with the Bounding the Land exhibit on one side and the life-sized cross-section of a Native American tipi on the other greets you. The tipi is accompanied by a glass container full of Native American artifacts.

The hallway. Photo by the author, 2015.

The hallway. Photo by the author, 2015.

Then there’s the Animal hall. This showcases a wide variety of taxidermy specimens ranging from birds to bugs. Most of the species exhibited are native to the Northeast, which adds to the local museum feel. On the sidelines there is a diorama of what a Connecticut forest would have looked like a few thousand years ago.

The right wall of the Taxidermy, erm, Animal hall with the Bounding the Land exhibit in the background. Photo by the author, 2015.

The right wall of the Taxidermy, erm, Animal hall with the Bounding the Land exhibit in the background. Photo by the author, 2015.

The Connecticut Forest mural. Photo by the author, 2015.

The Connecticut Forest diorama. Photo by the author, 2015.

Connecticut Forest diorama detail. Photo by the author, 2015.

Connecticut Forest diorama detail. Photo by the author, 2015.

Finally I entered the special exhibit, Madagascar: ghosts of the past. The exhibit does a great job of telling the story of Madagascar’s Natural History. Here are some pictures:

Majungasaurus crenatissimus. Photo by the author, 2015.

Majungasaurus crenatissimus. Photo by the author, 2015.

Mahajangasuchus insignis. Photo by the author, 2015.

Mahajangasuchus insignis. Photo by the author, 2015.

Another view of the Mahajungasuchus skull. Photo by the author, 2015.

Another view of the Mahajungasuchus skull. Photo by the author, 2015.

The Cretaceous Madagascar display. Photo by the author, 2015.

The Cretaceous Madagascar display. Photo by the author, 2015.

The skull of Vintana sertichi. Photo by the author, 2015.

The skull of Vintana sertichi. Photo by the author, 2015.

The Aepyornis/ Ostrich exhibit. Photo by the author, 2015.

The Aepyornis/ Ostrich exhibit. Photo by the author, 2015.

The extinct Malagasy mammal exhibit. Photo by the author, 2015.

The extinct Malagasy mammal exhibit. Photo by the author, 2015.

A panoramic view of the exhibit. Photo by the author, 2015.

A panoramic view of the exhibit. Photo by the author, 2015.

Finally, it was time to leave. Overall, it is a great museum which you should definitely visit if you are in the CT area (visit my museum first!). It does a great job of illustrating a broad picture of Natural History.

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