A New Theory on the Apex Predators of Appalachia

Hello everyone!  I’d like to share with you some recent developments regarding the study of dinosaurs from the eastern United States. Some new exciting research by Gotya et al. (2017) suggests that the apex predators of the continent were neither tyrannosauroids like Dryptosaurus aquilunguis nor huge crocodyliform taxa like Deinosuchus rugosus. 

Gotya et al. (2017) suggest, contrary to previous research, that Appalachia was in fact the home of large relatives of the pitcher plant genus Sarracenia. These plants, named Lythrophytum giganticum (“giant gore plant”), are thought by Gotya et al. (2017) to have grown in large groves, with each plant’s mouth heavily widened to ingest large prey. Through molecular studies of the fossils of this large pitcher plant, Gotya et al. (2017) concluded that the L. giganticum emitted a sweet smell to draw in medium-sized herbivorous dinosaurs and other large herbivores. Then, the action of the herbivores biting the flower would cause the plant to release a highly toxic substance that would paralyze the herbivore. Then, with the herbivore immobilized, the heat of the herbivore’s body would cause each of the flowers of the L. giganticum plants to turn towards the plant’s paralyzed prey, excreting an acidic solution to dissolve the body. Once dissolved, the nutrients of the herbivore would be absorbed by the plants. I have illustrated the proposed process below for better clarity.

IMG_2599

Completely Accurate Restoration. 

I’m very interested to see how work on these giant Mesozoic plants progresses into the future. For more information, click on the link to the paper below:

Gotya HA, Aprille FO, Ferst OLS. 2017. New fossils from the Late Cretaceous of the eastern United States provide evidence for carnivorous plants being the apex predators of Appalachia, or something. Journal of Creepy Creatures 24: 114-122.

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